Question: What Is The Meaning Behind The Hobbit?

Why is The Hobbit important?

“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.” So began the legendarium that dominated a genre, changed Western literature and the field of linguistics, created a tapestry of characters and mythology that endured four generations, built an anti-war ethos that endured a World War and a Cold War, and spawned a ….

What does the ring in Lord of the Rings symbolize?

The Ring. The ring is the center of the trilogy, and it gains multiple, changeable meanings as Frodo’s journey proceeds. Created by the evil Sauron, it is at first synonymous with its maker’s evil power. … It also suggests slavery and weakness, since whoever gives in to the temptation of the ring becomes a slave to it.

What is ironic about the way in which Smaug is killed?

Situational Irony ‘With a shriek that deafened men, felled trees and split stone, Smaug shot spouting into the air, turned over and crashed down from on high in ruin. Full on the town he fell. ‘ Yes, they finally got rid of the dragon, but when it lands on the town, the town is destroyed.

What does Bilbo gain from his adventure?

Bilbo gains bravery, wisdom, courage, and achieves self-actualization. He realizes upon his return (the auction) that the people of his hometown do not care about him.

What is the main message of the Hobbit?

The most prominent theme in The Hobbit is bravery, and the transformation of Bilbo Baggins from a timid homebody living quietly in his hobbit hole in the Shire to the brave hero at the center of a dangerous adventure. It was an act of bravery for Bilbo to simply leave the comfort of his home in the first place.

That’s not to say that “The Hobbit” or “The Lord of the Rings” are explicitly “Christian” tales. Chance says there are definite undertones of Christian theology throughout the two Tolkien books — both “deeply religious in their subtext.” … Christian themes are more subtle in Tolkien’s works than in those of Lewis.

Why is Bilbo the hero in The Hobbit?

Bilbo is not the usual hero that most of us are familiar with. He is small, he is not muscular and he does not participate in the war. Nonetheless Bilbo is undoubtedly a hero for several reasons: he fulfils a quest, he acquires a weapon and makes some heroic decisions based on his ethics.

What is the symbolism in Lord of the Rings?

Scholars and critics have identified many themes of The Lord of the Rings, a major fantasy novel by J. R. R. Tolkien, including a reversed quest, the struggle of good and evil, death and immortality, fate and free will, the danger of power, and various aspects of Christianity such as the presence of three Christ …

Is The Hobbit religious?

The Hobbit is an intrinsically Catholic book in which Tolkien’s narrator imposes his morally absolutist views on this world in opposition to some of Tolkien’s own views. Together, these parts will create an overall understanding of the role of the author’s religion in his Middle Earth novels.

Is The Hobbit based on the Bible?

We find no mention of God in The Hobbit, no prayers, Bibles, churches, priests, or ministers — none of the things typically associated with the Christian faith. Fans also know Tolkien was a Professor of Anglo-Saxon and that his writings were influenced by the myths of Northern Europe which he and his friend, C. S.

Why did Bilbo give Bard the Arkenstone?

Bilbo gives the Arkenstone of Thrain, ‘the Heart of the Mountain’, to Bard to aid him in his bargaining with Thorin. Bilbo recognizes the importance of the jewel, telling Bard that “it is also the heart of Thorin. He values it above a river of gold” (244).

What is the symbolism in The Hobbit?

The Arkenstone symbolizes a bygone era of peace—a time when Thorin’s ancestors were at one with nature and the species of Middle-earth lived in harmony. Thorin is desperate to keep the Arkenstone (and the rest of his treasure hoard), refusing to share with anyone.

What lesson does the Hobbit teach?

The Hobbit is telling us to take risks. This is what life is about, taking yourself out of your comfort zone and seeing what you are made of. Bilbo realises that there is more to life and the world than just being an ordinary Hobbit living in The Shire.