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How to Motivate Children to Read More, and my 2018 Reading List

In 2018, I read almost 50 books. Most of them I loved! I have a hard time finishing a whole book if I don’t absolutely love it. But there are a few that were less than wonderful, but that I still pushed through to the end. In the next couple weeks, I’ll be posting reviews for each of the books.

This year, I’ll be trying to match, if not exceed, last years total. I also have been doing my best to motivate my young siblings to read more, and especially more of high literature. My 11-year-old sister and 13-year-old brother are not always avid readers, especially if something has been assigned for school work. They were devastated to hear about some of the books that I was assigning them to read, and the sheer number of them (which really wasn’t that much.) But then I decided to make it a competition. They are both very competitive personalities, and as soon as I suggested that they could keep a list of how many books they read, and could score the books on a scale of 1 to 5 stars according to difficulty level, and whoever had the most stars at the end of the semester would win, they could not stop talking about it! Every time they see me now, they ask how many stars is this book worth, how many stars for that book?

My system is: I will grant three stars for something that is at their reading level, and then go up and down according to that. But if something is considered a classic, it gets an extra star, and if something is a specially long, then it gets an extra star. So, for example, Alice in Wonderland is two stars according to middle school difficulty level, but three stars, total, since it is a classic.

My brother has been trying to push through Lord of the Rings for a very long time, but now that he knows he will get 5 stars ⭐️ every time he finishes one of the books, he’s all over it!

I’m so excited to see what they read this year! Welcome 2019!

My 2018 reading list

1. Brave New World

2. The World of Winnie-thePooh

3. Heir to the Empire

4. The Tempest

5. Paper Towns

6. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

7. The Art of Loving God

8. Creating Character Arcs

9. Boys Adrift

10. Odd Thomas

11. The Color Purple

12. Anya’s Ghost

13. The Hard Thing About Hard Things

14. Romeo and Juliet

15. The Once and Future King

16. Catherine of Sienna

17. The Two Princesses of Bamarre

18. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

19. The Book of Merlyn

20. Running Down a Dream

21. Maggie Now

22. The ONE Thing

23. Ella Enchanted

24. The Eye of the World (Wheel of Time)

25. Twelfth Night

26. Good Morning Midnight

27. Peter Pan

28. Winnie-the-Pooh

29. The Lost Kingdom of Bamarre

30. Pride and Prejudice

31. Where the Mountain Meets the Moon

32. The Epic of Gilgamesh

33. As You Like It

34. A Christmas Carol

35. The Loser Letters

36. Halfbreeds

37. Dogbert’s Top Secret Management Handbook

38. Forever Odd

39. Vader’s Little Princess

40. The Giraffe and the Pelly and Me

41. The Last Painting of Sara de Vos

42. And to Think that I Saw It on Mulberry Street

43. Ruth Hall

44. Princess Academy

45. How the Grinch Stole Christmas

46. Mother Angelica Her Grand Silence

47. From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

48. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

49. Esio Trot

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Literacy: The Phenomenon that made us Culturally Inept

Just joined Medium.com, and this was my first post! You can read the entirety here.

We see illiteracy as a negative thing because without being able to read, we lack the ability to effectively communicate ideas. But, ironically, our reliance on literacy has actually led to a degradation in our confidence to communicate through the written word.

While any average person on the street can tell you how to pronounce the sounds of the alphabet, or how to spell “Kardashian,” they stumble over writing a basic business email. And most wouldn’t have the confidence to sit down before a room of kindergartners and tell them a ten-minute story about a cat and a ball of yarn.

Yet this is a very simple process, drawn upon everyday experience, with a very simple audience who, if you make the cat fall down or get twisted in the yarn, will be very forgiving of your mistakes. They just want to hear about how a cat responds to the yarn because it helps them understand life. The illiterate children relate to storytelling better than…continue reading