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Action/Adventure Genre

Action/Adventure is an EXTERNAL GENRE.

External Genres, as opposed to Internal, are primarily driven by a problem that comes up outside the person, and solving this problem results in the end of the story.

The problem usually looks like a large-scale villain. Someone the protagonist has to face off against and prevent them from doing permanent harm to the world.

Mystery, Horror, Thriller, Comedy – these are all External Genres. However, it is HOW these stories are told that determine what genre they fall into.

My brother and I determined the genre according to the emotion the story raises in us, and Action/Adventure raises the emotion of excitement. It puts us, with our hearts racing, on the edge of our seats, wondering at each moment what is going to happen next. It’s a lean forward, hands on you knees, emotion.

This is one of the largest genres of all time.

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Example Action/Adventure Stories are:

  • All the Marvel Films
  • Pirates of the Caribbean
  • All Star Wars Films
  • Dark Knight Trilogy
  • Lord of the Rings
  • Cowboys vs. Aliens
  • Bourne Identity
  • Mission Impossible
  • The Matrix

If the story is edge of your seat action, but takes the action lightly, it is not an Action/Adventure genre. Action/Adventure takes itself seriously. Guardians of the Galaxy is the closest you get to comedy without being a part of the comedy genre, only because it is part of a larger universe, and the characters are in real, permanent danger throughout the the story.

The story begins with a problem – someone is kidnapped, someone is running for their life, someone is pulled out of normal life and thrust against an evil force. The story ends when that someone defeats the evil force. All in between is full of nail-biting action – this is the Action/Adventure Genre.

I’ll do the comedy genre next.

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Romance

It’s been awhile since I’ve done a post about genre, and I think it’s overdue.

Romance is another of the simple genres, so I’m going to get that one out of the way with this post.

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Most of us could say right off the bat what a romance genre is. Romance begins with two people who are not in love, and who are in some way closed to falling in love. Usually their problem is internal, but sometimes it is an external obstacle. By the end of the story, they’re both in love. That, in its barest form, is romance.

Example romance stories are:

Pride and Prejudice

You’ve Got Mail

Sleepless in Seattle

The Lake House

27 Dresses

How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days

Romance is the first of the INTERNAL GENRES that I’ve posted about. Internal Genre stories are all driven by a personal problem for the protagonist. As the story progresses, the main character has to shift their world view until they see the world differently. For the Romance Genre, the World View is a shift from ‘closed to love’ to ‘open to love.’

And just to avoid any confusion, the love must be amorous and romantic in order for the story to be a Romance. Other types of love, such as a parent for a child, friendship, or pet love, would not be a romance.

I’ll do Action/Adventure Next! Keep an eye out!

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The Seven Ravens by Ludwig Bechstein

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The Seven Ravens Source Text

Illustrators:

Allison Reimold

Oscar Herrfurth

Adrian Ludwig Richter

Mary Alayne Thomas

Lisbeth Zwerger

Jana Heidersdorf

Teresa Jenellen

Ryan LeMere

Gustaf Tenggren

Maria Pascual